Dynamiq Consultants http://dynamiqconsultants.co.uk Turning Change to Advantage Sat, 01 Aug 2015 20:03:48 +0000 en hourly 1 Copyright © Dynamiq Consultants 2014 support@blymi.com (Dynamiq Consultants) support@blymi.com (Dynamiq Consultants) 1440 http://dynamiqconsultants.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/dynamiqlogo-144.png Dynamiq Consultants http://dynamiqconsultants.co.uk 144 144 Turning Change to Advantage Dynamiq Consultants Dynamiq Consultants support@blymi.com no no Why Do Your Technical People Need Sales and Influencing Skills? http://dynamiqconsultants.co.uk/articles/why-do-your-technical-people-need-sales-and-influencing-skills/ http://dynamiqconsultants.co.uk/articles/why-do-your-technical-people-need-sales-and-influencing-skills/#comments Sat, 01 Aug 2015 20:03:48 +0000 Blymi http://dynamiqconsultants.co.uk/?p=2430

Why Do Your Technical People Need Sales and Influencing Skills?

Recently I was asked to deliver some short sessions on influencing skills for a local client… they were concerned that their people, whilst technically highly qualified, lacked the essential skills of influencing others. They had identified this was mainly in …

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Why Do Your Technical People Need Sales and Influencing Skills?

Recently I was asked to deliver some short sessions on influencing skills for a local client…

they were concerned that their people, whilst technically highly qualified, lacked the essential skills of influencing others. They had identified this was mainly in conversations with their clients and customers. Staff were agreeing to extra work within a project without additional charges to customers and tense relationships developed. So “what is the need here” is it ‘influencing skills training’, ‘communication skills training’ or ‘sales skills training’?

When I looked into this situation a little deeper, it was in a range of relationships where they had difficulties, not just with customers. They also had issues internally with each other, resulting in duplication and a real lack of co-ordinated work. This resulted in poor service delivery and tensions between the company and its customers. Not good news, I am sure you would agree.

So probably any training would help, but would it address the fundamental problem that was not just a lack of skill, but also a lack of confidence coupled with high anxiety.

Why does this happen and what is the solution?

Many people who are highly skilled technically develop their set of skills precisely because they enjoy dealing with certainty, for example; doctors, scientists and technicians. This expertise can really pay off for their patients, clients and customers, but when it comes to communication they can struggle because they are not dealing with such a predictable set of parameters.

This situation I describe above was compounded by the fact that they were also really busy and couldn’t give up a lot of time. Sending staff on an intensive course probably wouldn’t have worked in the long term and the company just couldn’t afford to release them for long periods of time. Part of the problem was their “busy-ness” they wanted to do everything really quickly and were often distracted by things other than the communication they were involved in. So the first thing was to get them to stop, slow down and think about the purpose of the next communication, think about the people involved and how they needed to behave.

We ended up running short sessions (2 hours max), in small groups on a series of topics i.e. Account Management, Negotiation, Sales and Influencing skills. We then continued to meet with them individually for 40 minute coaching sessions, once a fortnight. We also stayed in touch by email and telephone and this has continued for around six months now. These sessions offer the opportunity not only for coaching but enables us to introduce further techniques and skills that the person can apply individually in their practice so learning is personalised.

What impact did the training in sales, negotiation and influencing skills have on the company?

This intervention has been transformational for the company. The relationships with customers and each other, whilst not perfect, are a lot better. Perhaps we are moving to a different approach to development with more individual support and less attendance at traditional courses. This is having a more profound and long term effect on the people within the organisations we work with.

Working with this client has led us to re-evaluating the way we deliver our training in sales, negotiation and influencing skills. We need to think about training delivery and what would be the most effective way for the client that considers the underlying factors present in any learner.

If you want to discuss your teams negotiation and selling skills further, give us a call on 0114 236 3781.

Dynamiq Consultants

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Questioning in the Sales Process http://dynamiqconsultants.co.uk/articles/questioning-sales-process/ http://dynamiqconsultants.co.uk/articles/questioning-sales-process/#comments Sat, 01 Aug 2015 08:05:05 +0000 ianflemming http://dynamiqconsultants.co.uk/?p=2290

Questioning in the Sales Process

Creating The Right Foundation Those involved in the sales process need a range of skills in order to be successful. These include a thorough knowledge and understanding of their products and services, knowledge of the market and competitors, an ability …

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Questioning in the Sales Process

Creating The Right Foundation

Those involved in the sales process need a range of skills in order to be successful. These include a thorough knowledge and understanding of their products and services, knowledge of the market and competitors, an ability to build and maintain relationships and particularly they need to be skilled in asking questions.

This short article looks at the type of questioning skills that are required to build an effective relationship.

Clearly questions are a key component in the sales process and provide sellers, consultants, account managers or anyone involved in sales valuable information such as

  • What are the needs of their organisation?
  • How immediate or urgent are these needs?
  • Can the needs be developed so they match your offering more closely?
  • What are their feelings and thoughts are about your offering?
  • How close are they to taking a decision?
  • Who is involved in decision taking?
  • What are the politics in the organisation?

There are many methods of questioning in the sales process that are suggested by training organisations from the very prescriptive and mechanical to the almost therapeutic approach.

In sales we need a combination of these techniques probing where appropriate to get the client really thinking about their situation but also gaining simple straightforward facts.

We believe at Dynamiq that a questioning approach is essential to success, but this needs to be an intelligent one, asking a range of questions. We want to take the discussion to a level where we get customers thinking about challenges they face and what they really want to achieve.

Gain Insight, Trust, and Understand Their Needs

What we are going to do is introduce a technique that will help you in getting to know the person over time and this will help us to create a foundation, really getting to understand the customer and their needs.

Later we will explore how to sell effectively to the customer.

Taken from the world of psychology laddering is a technique which can help develop rapport and find out about individuals motivations.

It is a technique for questioning that can help us to gain insights about others and in particular why they:-

  • Do the things they do.
  • Believe certain things.
  • Act in particular ways.
  • Say the things they say

The technique can only work if accompanied by genuine interest and curiosity about the other person. This means listening carefully and not interpreting what is said too quickly, and without any checking out.

Usually if we demonstrate that we are not judging the other person then they will feel OK about the conversation and feel more able to trust us.

Most of us like talking about ourselves when we feel there is sufficient trust and we feel valued if the other person is able to show a non-judgemental interest. These skills form a foundation that enables us to build and maintain effective working relationships.

The ladder enables you to go deeper and really understand your customer’s values and beliefs and factors which will influence their motivation to buy your services and products.

How To Start The Sales Process With Laddering

Start with simple and straightforward facts, for example:

  • What did you do before coming into this job?
  • How much time do you spend on various elements of the job?
  • What do you understand as your key responsibilities?
  • What do you find most challenging?

If we have listened carefully then we can then ladder down to a deeper layer and follow up what we have heard with further questions for example:

  • What do you enjoy about your work?
  • What do you find difficult?
  • What specific events have you found exciting and why?
  • What events have you found difficult and why?
  • How did you feel on that occasion?

Again if we have held good attention and listened carefully we can go deeper still for example:

  • Why do you think you felt that way?
  • Would you normally respond this way?
  • Why do you think this might be?
  • Why do you think you find this difficult?
  • What interests you about this so much?

Finally we may on a few occasions go a little further:

  • What does that tell you about yourself?
  • Why is that important to you?
  • Why do you hold that belief?
  • What effect does that have on others around you?

These are not the only questions you will ask but they will form the basis of a long term relationship and the customer will get the customer thinking about their real priorities.

Later we will talk about some questions that can be really useful in moving the sales process forward.

Dynamiq Consultants

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ILM accredited training now offered http://dynamiqconsultants.co.uk/articles/ilm-accredited-training-now-offered/ http://dynamiqconsultants.co.uk/articles/ilm-accredited-training-now-offered/#comments Fri, 31 Jul 2015 20:02:50 +0000 ianflemming http://dynamiqconsultants.co.uk/?p=2558

ILM accredited training now offered

Training offered to develop your team leaders, operational and senior managers. For further information, please contact us.

Dynamiq Consultants

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ILM accredited training now offered

Training offered to develop your team leaders, operational and senior managers.
For further information, please contact us.

Dynamiq Consultants

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Newsletter – Autumn 2014 http://dynamiqconsultants.co.uk/communication/newsletter-autumn-2014-2/ http://dynamiqconsultants.co.uk/communication/newsletter-autumn-2014-2/#comments Fri, 31 Jul 2015 08:02:32 +0000 ianflemming http://dynamiqconsultants.co.uk/?p=2570

Newsletter – Autumn 2014

Newsletter – Autumn 2014 Supervisory Training Course – Supervisor in Action Our supervisor training course continued to be popular with programmes running throughout the summer with a current client. This development course is aimed at first line managers and supervisors …

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Newsletter – Autumn 2014

Newsletter – Autumn 2014

Supervisory Training Course – Supervisor in Action

Our supervisor training course continued to be popular with programmes running throughout the summer with a current client. This development course is aimed at first line managers and supervisors to help them identify how they can improve their leadership skills and is endorsed by The Institute of leadership and Management (ILM). The course provides a development opportunity for those new to the role of supervisor or team leader as well as established leaders who have not undertaken any formal training.

It is a very practical training course underpinned by models and concepts, which are explored in the group through discussions, questionnaires and paired exercises. This enables the participants to fully understand how these apply to them, in the situations that they have to deal with on a day to day basis.  A key element of the course is supporting the learners to plan how they are going to apply their learning back in their own workplace.

The course currently being delivered has a unique feature, in that the learning group have an opportunity to prepare for a ‘Question and Answer’ session with a senior manager or director.

This two-way communication opportunity provides a platform for staff to find the answer to some of the questions that may have been an issue for them and the staff they manage, perhaps why things are being done in a certain way or to a set timescale.  Carefully managed, this empowering exercise builds a bridge between the perceived gap between ‘Staff and Management’ and puts a face and personality to a senior manager, who has the opportunity to clarify the company goals and plans to those working on the front line.

This course can be tailored for any organisation, building on existing policies and corporate change programmes where results need to be delivered.

Please contact us, for further information on our development programmes for team leaders and supervisors or for an informal chat of how we can help you with development of your managers and supervisors.

Some quotes from participants

“Fantastic course, well presented by both trainers”
“Very supportive team that made learning a positive experience”
“Good course, this can only help me”

 

Fixed Fee Package Deals

We recently worked with a client who had a set budget to spend, a vague people development strategy but clear delivery timescales. After an initial free diagnostic meeting we were able to design a bespoke development programme of 3 courses, which all staff would attend. ‘Extras’ were purchased for staff who benefited from a series of coaching sessions.

Success of this initiative was measurable by increased sales and improved relationships between teams and clients.

We are planning to offer this winning formula to other organisations during the Autumn as we are developing a ‘pick and mix’,  fixed fee programme, that will enable smaller organisations access to quality training at a set price that is within their budget.

Rather than an extensive diagnostic process, with a quote for what you need, (we can do this too!)  followed by decisions about budgets etc., our Pick & Mix offer will allow you to decide how much you have to spend and take your pick of courses.

We are interested to find out what courses you would like offered as options within this fixed fee package. Those that we have offered before include

1 day courses

  • Commercial Awareness
  • Negotiation Skills
  • Improving Sales
  • An Introduction to Leadership skills
  • Influencing
  • An Introduction to Coaching Skills

A benefit of this type of training purchase means that as new staff start with the company, the training can be delivered again in small groups ensuring a consistency of approach.

Extras to the package

Extras to the set budget package can include individual coaching, MBTI with individuals or whole teams followed up with team development sessions. Costs for these are negotiable.

Tell us what you think

Tell us what you would find useful to include in our ‘pick and mix’ offering using the contact link on the home page. No obligations!

More details in our next newsletter, but if you already have an idea of what you need and a budget in mind, contact us and we’ll tell you what we can offer.

 

Regards from The Dynamiq Team

 

You have been sent this newsletter as you have subscribed to our website. If you no longer wish to subscribe please contact us.

 

 

 

 

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Positional Bargaining http://dynamiqconsultants.co.uk/articles/positional-bargaining/ http://dynamiqconsultants.co.uk/articles/positional-bargaining/#comments Thu, 30 Jul 2015 20:06:45 +0000 Blymi http://dynamiqconsultants.co.uk/?p=2372

Positional Bargaining

Positional bargaining by its very essence implies that you adopt a certain position and then proceed to bargain based on this position. The intention is to keep as close to this as possible so that you achieve a desirable outcome. …

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Positional Bargaining

Positional bargaining by its very essence implies that you adopt a certain position and then proceed to bargain based on this position. The intention is to keep as close to this as possible so that you achieve a desirable outcome.

There may be several reasons for adopting this position, amongst them; a fear of the negotiation getting out of control, poor or hurried preparation and reluctance to engage in the creative process. Also there may be a strong desire to WIN the negotiation and not get taken advantage of.

Why Are We Negotiating?

Let’s go back to why we are in the negotiation in the first place. Presumably we want productive relationships with both our customers and suppliers, one where we genuinely feel we are getting value and we usually see as long term.

We know the cost of getting new sales is considerably higher than cultivating existing relationships and also we know that engaging new suppliers who don’t really understand our business has considerable costs in the early stages.

We want suppliers who care about the service they give and our perception of it, listen to our feedback, take action on it and really work for us. So it’s important that the negotiation is a win-win negotiation with both parties feeling they have a good deal.

What’s In It For Them?

If you are losing customers and suppliers are no longer keen to supply you,it’s worth asking why? Why are they are no longer happy working with you? Could it be they think they‘re not getting good value from the business relationship? Could it be that they feel they were taken advantage of in the initial negotiation?

So let’s look at some principles that can improve your negotiations

  • Assess what the other person’s objectives might be and identify what is really important to them. What things might they be willing to give ground on easily
  • Identify things that are clearly NOT negotiable, then think about positions where you might be prepared to move yourself, and what you would like in return. It might be the customer or supplier can give this easily. For example if you are a bit short of cash you might be able to give a small discount for guaranteed improvement in payment terms.
  • The essence of skilful negotiation is creativity, so have several options around each of the negotiable issues. This will enable you to move positions so that you continue to have a negotiating position, rather than just concede.
  • Listen to the other person’s ideas and ask questions to get their ideas. Remember, you are looking for a win-win situation, where they feel they have a good deal and can go back to their board feeling proud of what they have achieved and you are also happy with the deal.
  • Be prepared to embrace ideas you have not considered, they might really work for you.
  • Finally, develop your interpersonal skills. Most people say that it’s the face to face communication that counts, so relax and be confident; be tough on the issues and soft on the people.

In the next article we will look at preparation needed for effective negotiation. A podcast will also be available which you can download from our site.

Dynamiq Consultants

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Negotiation Preparation & Success – Part 1 http://dynamiqconsultants.co.uk/articles/negotiation-preparation-and-success-part-1/ http://dynamiqconsultants.co.uk/articles/negotiation-preparation-and-success-part-1/#comments Thu, 30 Jul 2015 08:03:07 +0000 ianflemming http://dynamiqconsultants.co.uk/?p=2532

Negotiation Preparation & Success – Part 1

One of my colleagues recently said they found it very useful to attend the Dynamiq Consultants U.K. negotiating skills training. They especially appreciated the concept of putting yourself in the shoes of the other party! When any of us are …

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Negotiation Preparation & Success – Part 1

One of my colleagues recently said they found it very useful to attend the Dynamiq Consultants U.K. negotiating skills training. They especially appreciated the concept of putting yourself in the shoes of the other party!

When any of us are negotiating we often go in with a pre-set frame of mind when all we tend to think about is “I want this – I want that – I want the next thing”, rather than the other way round, by which I mean thinking about what’s important to the other side, and why is that important to them?

Conceding reluctantly

They may want things which you can give them quite easily, but you should generally try to make sure that you get something back in return. The way to do this is to avoid making it obvious when what they want is not a problem for you! In this way you might get an ideal outcome from your angle when they might think that you’ve had to compromise more than in fact is the case.

They may want flexibility of design in the event or process you are offering to them. They might ask you to modify your designs and plans, having no real idea if this will be easy or difficult for you, though it is really important to them.

It may be very important to one of my clients that I be willing to restructure and modify the design of a training programme which I know I can modify pretty easily, in fact. But if I am a shrewd negotiator, I don’t give that fact away for nothing. I do a little reluctant conceding In other words, I give the impression that I will be in some difficulties providing what they are asking for, but in reality it’s not a problem, or only a little one, for me. They get something they value a lot from me, and my willingness to concede ground may increase their willingness to do so when I am seeking a concession of some kind from them.

Developing Leverage

This is all about developing increased leverage; some things I can give away relatively or very easily that the other side value a lot. In all negotiations, they want lots of things as, of course, I do!

Getting paid more quickly

In the case of one of my current clients, I reckon they could pay me a lot quicker than they do! I could renegotiate my invoicing and payment arrangements with them. I could suggest that, in exchange for a modest discount, they could pay me more quickly or on a monthly or on some other ‘preferred supplier’ basis reducing my running costs and business overdraft charges. This may be really easy for them and not an important issue, as they are a cash rich organisation to which my fees are a mere drop in their fiscal ocean! I must be aware, however, that they may – in turn – do some reluctant conceding before agreeing to this. They don’t want it all to seem too easy, any more than I do!

As in all negotiating situations, you must try not to give the impression that many of the things being asked for or demanded are of little or no importance or difficulty to you. If an issue is very tricky or you think it could consume more time than is needed or available right now, then saying “Can we come back to that later, as it’s really important and will need careful consideration?” can be a very useful expression if not overused!

If I am a relatively small enterprise, It may be extremely helpful to me to be paid very regularly, on a retainer or standing order basis for example, but I need not let on to them about that as a ‘needy’ issue – better to stress that it would simplify the project’s cash flow and facilitate future programme planning, resourcing and co-ordination – to the benefit of both sides.

Mirroring

Another term for this is mirroring! Example …. “If you could pay us on a monthly standing order basis, representing 1/12th of our contracted business with you over the year ahead, then we could accommodate your requirement for a high degree of flexibility in our event and programme planning, which is a time and resource intensive issue for us!”

One key skill to be imparted in training people to negotiate successfully is to stress the importance of aiming for a WIN WIN outcome for all, or as perceived by all. Even the most skilled and successful negotiators need to keep remembering to use this skill in all their business negotiations.

Issues of importance to clients…

Some issues are especially important to clients including the flexibility of design, price, quality and standard of delivery. As you can see from our negotiating video and the accompanying articles on this website, good negotiators prepare in advance and give thought to all of the issues that you want to cover and how important those issues are to you. Then you think about your ideal outcome and compare it with the least that you might accept.

In my fee structure I might for example want to charge £12,000 ideally. Then I think about what concessions I might need to be willing to make, so I might be prepared to do the deal at £10,000 but not go lower than that. In this way I develop a realistic set of parameters for the piece of business in hand.

Unless anything radically changed! They might suddenly say they want twenty programmes, so I might modify my target fee structure.
The most important thing is to think about these possibilities in advance, so that you are prepared when they occur. Sometimes you will be working in a negotiating team when this is even more critical.

In our video on negotiation skills I talk about a colleague who worked in the Health Service as a Director of Procurement. He used to go with the Chief Executive of a PCT (a body that funds hospitals) to meet the Chief Executive of a Hospital Trust to negotiate. He told me that the only preparation he did was in the lift on his way to the conference room.

Does that mean that he was a highly skilled negotiator or just a lucky one?

He was unlucky I thought because he’d have been a lot luckier if he’d prepared. It’s like the golfer, Arnold Palmer, who famously said “The more I practice the luckier I get!”

In part 2 of our series ‘Negotiation Preparation and Success’ we look at preparation in more detail, and what makes a negotiator successful.  If you would like more help and guidance on negotiation skills, please contact us or call on 0114 2363781.

Article by Ian Flemming and Peter Collett .

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9 Strategies to Transform Your Next Negotiation http://dynamiqconsultants.co.uk/podcast/9-strategies-to-transform-your-next-negotiation/ http://dynamiqconsultants.co.uk/podcast/9-strategies-to-transform-your-next-negotiation/#comments Wed, 29 Jul 2015 20:05:05 +0000 Blymi http://dynamiqconsultants.co.uk/?p=2380

9 Strategies to Transform Your Next Negotiation

What does the other side really want? Do we ask the right questions? What sort of preparation will give us the best advantage? Here are 9 tips that can have a direct influence on your next negotiations, be that regular …

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9 Strategies to Transform Your Next Negotiation

What does the other side really want? Do we ask the right questions? What sort of preparation will give us the best advantage? Here are 9 tips that can have a direct influence on your next negotiations, be that regular internal meetings or complex contract negotiations. Even just a small change can reap great rewards.

Dynamiq Consultants

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Effective Personal and Work-related Planning – Part 1 http://dynamiqconsultants.co.uk/articles/planning-part-1/ http://dynamiqconsultants.co.uk/articles/planning-part-1/#comments Wed, 29 Jul 2015 08:02:58 +0000 peter http://dynamiqconsultants.co.uk/?p=2500

Effective Personal and Work-related Planning – Part 1

Whilst all of us would agree that we never plan to fail, many of us nevertheless fail to plan. I was once a member of a large team of management trainers, working in the residential training headquarters of a Government …

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Effective Personal and Work-related Planning – Part 1

Whilst all of us would agree that we never plan to fail, many of us nevertheless fail to plan.
I was once a member of a large team of management trainers, working in the residential training headquarters of a Government department in the UK.

Many of our in-house jokes contained more than a small grain of truth! On a typical Monday morning, before our new groups of students arrived from all over Britain to attend training courses in supervisory and management skills, you would hear such comments as…

  • “I’ve been invited to attend a decision-making course, but I just can’t make up my mind whether to go or not.”
  • “I was going to go on a problem-solving course, but we had so many difficulties in our office I had to put it off.”
  • “I was going to attend a time management course, but I was just too busy to find the time.”
  • “Every time I’m invited to attend a seminar on motivational leadership skills, I simply can’t be bothered.”
  • “I missed out on a planning skills course because I forgot to put the dates in my diary!”
  • “I’d sort of like to go on an assertiveness course, please, that is if nobody minds!”

On first reading, these quotes can seem very amusing. However, they do demonstrate the tendency of many of us to assume that the only, or even the best way forward is to be immersed in a constant state of reaction and fevered activity, always seen to be firing on all four cylinders, ready to tackle any and every situation that arises in the course of a day immediately, confidently and swiftly.

Don’t confuse Speed with Efficiency!

So often, we confuse speed with efficiency, frenetic activity with effectiveness, and swift decision making (to achieve rapid, ‘quick fix’ outcomes) as being the virtue of decisiveness.

At the end of our working day, we often leave work feeling exhausted, “bloodied but unbowed”, feeling that we have made no real or meaningful progress but that, at least, we have weathered the storms of today: have given the outward appearance of being strong, organized and able to hack it, and hoping that tomorrow, perhaps, will prove to be less of an ordeal to be survived at all costs.

I put it to you, that in your work and in your personal world, the failure to plan how you will use your precious resources of time and energy, day by day, will usually result in you having very little of either under your personal control.

Almost regardless of whether you are at the very top of your organisational tree or at the sharp end of what your organisation delivers in the way of products or services: if you do not regularly seek to exercise a measure of control over how your time and energy are spent, you’re likely to experience daily life as consisting of an unending series of demands, crises, problems, worries, dramas, irritations and the overriding tyranny of the routine vs. the important: of the pressing vs. the truly urgent.

I will, in the next part of this article, share with you what I believe to be a simple, quick to apply, yet highly effective approach to everyday personal planning, be that in the workplace or at home.

The confusion of speed with efficiency is, in our view, at the very core of many of the unhelpful and profoundly wasteful business practices and personal attitudes (mental sets) prevailing in the technologically advanced and materially prosperous parts of our world as we move further into the ‘tweenies’.

I sometimes joke to mostly unreceptive ears that it’s as if we are shouting at each other, “We may not be getting anywhere but just look at how fast we are doing it!”

It’s often, however, those who regularly deal with extremely urgent and life critical situations who are best at adopting a planned and measured approach. My favourite example of the truth of this is the true story of the surgeon in charge of an accident and emergency department of the city hospital when a young casualty arrived in his operating theatre, having been multiply injured in a road traffic accident.

“He turned to his team of surgeons and nurses and said, “Let us not hurry for there is no time to waste.”

…..to be continued …..

by Ian Flemming and Peter Collett ©2013 Dynamiq Consultants

To discuss this theme or any others you have read about on our website, or to suggest any theme or topic you would like us to write about, please get in touch with us at any time via CONTACT US, or e-mail our resident writer peter@dynamiqconsultants.co.uk, remembering to provide your contact details.  We hope to hear from you soon.

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Video: An Interview with Ian Flemming on Negotiation Skills http://dynamiqconsultants.co.uk/articles/video-an-interview-with-ian-flemming-on-negotiation-skills/ http://dynamiqconsultants.co.uk/articles/video-an-interview-with-ian-flemming-on-negotiation-skills/#comments Tue, 28 Jul 2015 20:04:54 +0000 Blymi http://dynamiqconsultants.co.uk/?p=2358

Video: An Interview with Ian Flemming on Negotiation Skills

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Video: An Interview with Ian Flemming on Negotiation Skills

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You Have Control?! http://dynamiqconsultants.co.uk/articles/you-have-control/ http://dynamiqconsultants.co.uk/articles/you-have-control/#comments Tue, 28 Jul 2015 08:03:07 +0000 Blymi http://dynamiqconsultants.co.uk/?p=2474

You Have Control?!

You are not a happy bunny!  You’ve been standing in a slow-moving, then virtually stationary queue for over two hours, caged in a like a rat in a trap, nothing to do or look at other than the ‘cage maze’ …

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You Have Control?!

You are not a happy bunny!  You’ve been standing in a slow-moving, then virtually stationary queue for over two hours, caged in a like a rat in a trap, nothing to do or look at other than the ‘cage maze’ surrounding you on all sides and even above you, listening to the same two minutes of pre-recorded music, noise and nonsense, waiting to go on a ride that is guaranteed to scare you witless and throw you around in all directions for a couple of minutes, when a cheerful – almost a gleeful and merry voice – pre-recorded, of course – tells you and the thousands waiting with you to disperse ‘immediately’ as the ride is now closed due to technical problems.  Who has control here?

“You have control!” a voice says in your ear as you are sitting belted into a seat several hundred yards above Bristol, at the dual controls of a Chipmunk training aircraft (giving my age away now!) on your first ever flight as a R.A.F. cadet.  Minutes later you are experiencing the exuberance of flying an aircraft that does what you tell it to do – every time – go left, right, up, down, faster, slower, round and round, all of these at once! – the world’s your oyster, or your lobster, as one of my favourite Mr Malaprop’s used to say in those days.   Push the joystick forward more than a fraction of an inch and you start to go into a dive, much to the annoyance of the proper pilot who says “Not like that, old boy, we want to stay in the air if possible don’t we, not make a nasty mess on the ground?!  Ease it back a tad … ah … that’s better!”.

Who has control here?

You are enjoying some ‘me’ time, as we love to call it these days.   Those bedding plants you’ve been meaning to plant out for the past week or more – already looking a bit limp and sorry for themselves – are beckoning you to take care of them.   So, you walk away from the ‘glass teat’ in one corner of the room (thanks to Stephen King’s book  “On Writing” for that one!), or the ‘thin controller’ (the one with the keyboard) in another corner, open the back door to the garden and the front door bell rings.

It’s your next door neighbour asking to borrow a small hammer.   You know what happened to their thumb last time you lent them a small hammer, so half an hour later – good deed done – you head for the garden again.   This time your mobile ‘phone plays you a tune that one of your children put on it to surprise you before they went to school.  You wonder where the hell that tune is coming from when you feel the vibration of the ‘phone, pull it out and answer it!

It’s that lovely person from TalkTalk, asking you if you’re having a good day and if you’d like to hear the latest special money-saving, super-fast-broadband etc. deal for ‘TalkTalk’ customers only.  It will only take a few minutes of your time.   Half an hour later, with another £ 10 per month going out of your account for the next year for an amazing package you like to think you understand – at least in part – you stand perplexed, wondering what you are doing in the garden!  Who has control here?

You switch off your mobile – toss it casually through the back door onto your favourite armchair, where it happily slides down between the cushion and the side, not to be found for quite some considerable time, as you’ve set it so it will not switch on in any circumstances other than by you pressing the button that manually switches the power on – how quaint!

By now the afternoon is wearing on so you decide to feed the pets, water the garden, mow the lawn, have a refreshing cup of tea and then take a look at those bedding plants – maybe even plant some out – water them at least.   By sheer perchance it is getting dark and your dinner is ready by the time you turn your attention to the bedding plants … never mind, there’s a day tomorrow isn’t there?

Who has control here?

We live in an age where there has never been more potential for control of just about every second of our conscious and semi-conscious time.  But who is doing almost all of the controlling?!  If you would like to be doing a lot more of it, and your business and colleagues and everyone else to be doing a lot less of it, so that you have – oh dream of dreams – some time to think, plan and make stuff better (rather than just keep running the treadmill of ‘the way it is’), why not give us a call on 0114 2363781 or e-mail us at info@dynamiqconsultants.co.uk with a ‘bullet points’ summary of your business frustrations, challenges, problems etc.   If you feel like getting lots of words down, feel free to do so, reading takes very little time compared to writing, as writers know only too well!   Just remember that “a word in earnest is as good as a speech.” (Charles Dickens).

We aren’t Fairy Godmothers, or Godfathers come to that, but we do have big, listening ears.  We tend not to display our wands, because it’s your magic, not ours, that they need to be charged up with.  The first time we meet you we’ll even listen to you at our expense and promise not to come up with any silly ‘instant fixes’ – we both know those don’t work, don’t we?  But do be aware that, if you ask us the time, we may ask to borrow your watch (a     very old joke about consultancy that carries a grain of truth)!

Whatever else happens, we promise to give you a good listening to, go away quietly and reflect on what you’ve told us, then drop you a line and come and see you again with something positive, productive and pragmatic to propose to you.

What do you have to lose but a weight off your mind and maybe your shoulders?  What do we have to lose but another learning experience?   What do we all have to gain?   Remembering your own youth again, that amazing voice in your ear that (in my case) actually said, “YOU HAVE CONTROL!”

by Ian Flemming and Peter Collett

Dynamiq Consultants

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